kaya publishes books of the asian pacific diaspora

 
 
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The theme of the third and final installment of Publishing Projects from UCLA students in Asian American Publishing with Kaya Press is Unheard Voices. Each of these pieces seeks to give a platform to writers, makers, and people that don’t traditionally fit the confines of societal or social expectation, and amplify the voices of the commonly unheard and unseen. 

Coalition of Asian American Leaders, by Sang Dao, explores the world of Asian American Leadership, specifically those leaders that inhabit roles that don’t fit the stereotypical idea of what careers or professions Asians and Asian Americans go into.

Even in Muddy Waters, the Lotus Blooms, by Marjorie Llanera. This publication works through many obstacles of Asian American and Asian college students and post- graduates, as multiple contributors use literature and the arts as means for resilience and self discovery. 

What I Wish I Could Tell You, by Natalie Albaran, explores the confines of time, social pressures, and other factors that affect what people choose to say (or not say) to others. Resilience, resistance, vulnerability, and catharsis are common themes in this compilation of letters, where each writer says something that they wish they could say or something they wish they would have said

What’s On Your Plate?, by Carina Lee, contains mouth watering testimonials and a look into local food vendors and small businesses in Southern California. 

A huge thank you to Kaya Press interns and Asian American Publishing students Natalie Albaran and Curtis Wong for their work in putting these posts together! And to all the students in the class, who made such amazing zines. Asian American Publishing with Kaya Press will be offered again at UCLA in Spring of 2021.

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“The most consistent intelligent wide-ranging committed press I know – Kaya is an example of how to turn ‘small’ books into literary arrows that shoot straight and true into the heart of our culture and (of course) ourselves.”

— Junot Díaz