kaya publishes books of the asian pacific diaspora

 
 
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Last month marked the publication of The Sympathizer, Kaya board member Viet Thanh Nguyen’s debut novel. We are so happy for him that his novel has made it to four bestseller lists of independent booksellers associations, and has also been reviewed on the Daily Beast and the New York Times. In addition, Nguyen has also written an article on […]

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In honor of National Poetry Month, NBC News released a list of Asian-American poets to look out for, including our very own Nicholas Wong! The piece talks about Nicholas’s poetry transcends language and place while taking on issues ranging from masculinity and sexuality to race and politics. You can read the entire piece, including a […]

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On Sunday, the 26th October of 2014, renowned Japanese avant-garde artist and writer Akasegawa Genpei passed away in Tokyo, leaving behind an inspiring legacy. His literary works include Rōjin-ryoku and Hyperart: Thomasson, the latter of which we published in English in 2010. Read words from our publisher & our translator here. Here are some photos in memory of Akasegawa. […]

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Last Wednesday, February 18th, Amarnath Ravva and Andrew Lam joined USC’S APASS DESI Project and the Department of American Studies and Ethnicity to read from their works and discuss Asian-American identity. Amar opened with a reading from AMERICAN CANYON and accompanying video clips which are featured as stills in his debut. Andrew Lam followed with […]

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In an interview with Wasafiri, a British magazine for contemporary international writing, Shailja Patel explores social justice issues through her distinct perspective as an activist and poet. She traces her trajectory to activism from her first career in finance and contemplates the complexity of labels. “‘Activist’ as it’s used in Kenya is inadequate for me because […]

 
 
 
 

“The most consistent intelligent wide-ranging committed press I know – Kaya is an example of how to turn ‘small’ books into literary arrows that shoot straight and true into the heart of our culture and (of course) ourselves.”

— Junot Díaz