kaya publishes books of the asian pacific diaspora

 
 
✚Categories
Monday, October 29, 2018
Asian/Pacific/American Institute at NYU
8 Washington Mews 
New York, NY 10003 United States
Phone: (212) 998-3700

Presented by the Asian/Pacific/American Institute at NYU. Co-sponsored by the NYU Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies, South Asian American Digital Archive, Rajkumari Cultural Center, Jahajee Sisters, and Guyana Modern.com.

While conducting research for her book Coolie WomanGaiutra Bahadur (Visiting Scholar, A/P/A Institute at NYU) came across Lal Bihari Sharma’s Holi Songs of Demerara, the only known literary work written by an indentured laborer in the Anglophone Caribbean. She passed the songbook, written in a combination of Awadhi, Bhojpuri, and Braj Bhasha, to award-winning Indo-Caribbean poet and translator Rajiv Mohabir, and a literary recovery project was born. Join us for a reading from I Even Regret Night: Holi Songs of Demerara (Kaya Press, 2018), which chronicles the “interior lives of indentured men” (Bahadur) on the sugar plantations of British Guiana. Bahadur, who wrote the book’s introduction, and Mohabir, who completed its translation, will be in conversation with Grace Aneiza Ali (NYU Department of Art & Public Policy). Audience members are invited to record their own family histories of indenture and migration with the South Asian American Digital Archive.

FREE ENTRY, RSVP here.

This venue has an elevator and is accessible for wheelchair users. Restrooms are single-stall, and all gender. If you need any accommodations, please email apa.rsvp@nyu.edu at least two weeks before the event date.

Photo of Gaiutra Bahadur (far right) by Joanna Eldredge Morrissey. 

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

We'd love to know what you think.

 
 
 
 

“The most consistent intelligent wide-ranging committed press I know – Kaya is an example of how to turn ‘small’ books into literary arrows that shoot straight and true into the heart of our culture and (of course) ourselves.”

— Junot Díaz