kaya publishes books of the asian pacific diaspora

 
 
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09/24

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Kaya Press is thrilled to be participating in the inaugural Little Tokyo Book Festival! The fair will highlight work from Asian American authors through panel discussions, book signings, and more. This exciting, brand new event will be hosted by the Japanese American Cultural & Community Center, one of the largest cultural and ethnic arts centers in the country. […]

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Huge congrats to Andrew Leong for winning the 2014 Association of Asian American Studies Book Award for Creative Writing for translating Shoshon Nagahara’s Lament in the Night (Kaya Press, 2012). Here is an excerpt from the incredible acceptance speech he gave: “With thanks to the Association – this award goes to Nagahara Hideaki Shōson, wherever he […]

04/20

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04/20

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Literature lovers far & wide: Come visit the Kaya Press and USC Master of Professional Writing Program’s SMOKIN’ HOT LIT LOUNGE (Booth 380 in Founders Park) at the LA Times Festival of Books! Dedicated to books, writing, independent publishing, and FUN: our booth features interactive lit activities for all ages, LA’s finest small presses, and a […]

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Some 87 years ago, Japanese American writer Shōson Nagahara serialized a novel, A Tale of Osato, in the pages of the Rafu Shimpo—a Japanese American newspaper, which first started in Little Tokyo back in 1903. Now, for the first time ever, Nagahara’s collected writings have been translated into English and published by Kaya Press: Lament in […]

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Some 87 years after Shōson Nagahara’s gritty stories of survival were published in Los Angeles’ Little Tokyo for a Japanese immigrant readership, Kaya Press brings you the first-ever English translation of these forgotten novellas: Lament in the Night, translated by Andrew Leong. Along with Nagahara’s writing, the book features dozens of archival photographs documenting Little […]

 
 
 
 

“The most consistent intelligent wide-ranging committed press I know – Kaya is an example of how to turn ‘small’ books into literary arrows that shoot straight and true into the heart of our culture and (of course) ourselves.”

— Junot Díaz