kaya publishes books of the asian pacific diaspora

 
 
✚Categories
24Nguyen-superJumbo-v2
ON

Our very own Kaya Press board member (and recent Pulitzer Prize winner), Viet Thanh Nguyen, recently penned a piece for the New Yorker called Reconsidering the Work of a Chinese Immigrant. Our main man Nguyen reviewed a book by Hua Hsu entitled A Floating Chinaman: Fantasy and Failure Across the Pacific that acts a biography […]

ON

In celebration of Nic Wong‘s birthday (February 3rd), check out this beautiful review of Crevasse that appeared in the Spring 2015 edition of The Asian American Literary Review! “. . . Experimenting with a mixture of humor and pathos, the conceptual and the conversational, Wong circles solitude, the emotion perhaps best understood through invocations of absence. There is the impression a […]

ON

Gene Oishi’s novel Fox Drum Bebop recently received a most insightful review by Jenny Xie, published in The Hopkins Review. In this review, Xie breaks down how Oishi portrays the protagonist Hiroshi Kono’s Japanese-American identity. She describes Oishi as “skilled and clear-eyed,” and the novel as impactful through “the ferocity of its voice.” You can read more of the review at this link.

ON

Emily Ballaine posted a review of Amarnath Ravva’s AMERICAN CANYON to The Improbable. In it, she praises Ravva’s hybridizing style and mastery of empty spaces. “American Canyon is a book that experiments with form, and when I say ‘experiment,’ I mean it in the truest sense of the word. I mean that Ravva approaches past […]

ON

Hawa Allan has reviewed Amarnath Ravva’s novel AMERICAN CANYON over at The Tricycle Foundation. Below is an excerpt of her review. You can read the complete review here. “Ravva eschews the hackneyed narrative device of the hyphenated American suspended between two worlds, lonely, liminal, and lost. Instead, he employs precise descriptions of what he sees and hears, devoid of any […]

 
 
 
 

“The most consistent intelligent wide-ranging committed press I know – Kaya is an example of how to turn ‘small’ books into literary arrows that shoot straight and true into the heart of our culture and (of course) ourselves.”

— Junot Díaz