kaya publishes books of the asian pacific diaspora

 
 
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Muae 2: Collapsing New Buildings

Kaya Press 1996

Collapsing New Buildings takes its name from the recent upsurge of industrial accidents throughout Asia. The 1995 collapse of the Sampoong Department Store in Seoul claimed hundreds of lives, and similar disasters have hit Thailand, India, China, and other nations of the so-called “developing world.” These events were perhaps the most dramatic evidence of a crisis in the economic and political development of Asia and the Pacific in the 1990s.

Foregrounding critical dialogues between the most outspoken intellectuals in Asia and the diaspora, Collapsing New Buildingslooks at the ways development has been theorized in an Asian context and interrogate the ways historical ideas of progress have been considered. To facilitate the exchange of critical ideas among diasporic and Asian communities, a third of Collapsing New Buildings has been translated into Korean.

Collapsing New Buildings features:
• Nobel Peace Prize nominee Sulak Sivaraksa and bell hooks on development as if people mattered.
• Rem Koolhaas and Masao Miyoshi on tabula rasa and new projects in Asia.
• Vandana Shiva and Joung Yoon Lym on bioengineering, intellectual property, and the colonization of science.
• Haunani-Kay Trask on sovereignty in Hawai’i.
• Critical Art Ensemble on posthuman development.
• Celeste Olalquiaga on tourism and decay in Caracas.
• A graphic story by Hanawa Kazuichi.
• A portfolio on the new wave of Iranian cinema, edited by Jamsheed Akrami.
• New fiction and poetry by Karen Tei Yamashita, Kimiko Hahn, and le thi diem thuy.
• Artist’s projects by Mariko Mori, Shu Lea Cheang, Kim MyoungHye, and Ahn Sung-Keum.

 
Muae

Muae

Kaya Press 1995

The inaugural volume features art and writing by Yi Sang, Kang Nae-hui on Lotte World’s shaping of consumer experience in Seoul, paintings on military sex slavery by Miran Kim, photographs on scale and simulacra at Florida’s Splendid China by Richard Barnes, and scenes from Nam June Paik’s Tribute to Charlotte Moorman.

 
Premonitions

Premonitions

Kaya Press 1995

The most comprehensive anthology of Asian North American poetry to date, Premonitions gathers work-ranging from cyberpunk meditations and Buddhist odes to L=A=N=G=U=A=G=E-influenced and neo-Orientalist writing–and juxtaposes them in ways that both echo and subvert categories of theme, poetics, and identity. Video and multimedia texts, pidgin poetry, queer writing, and Canadian open-field compositions further broaden the scope of this ground-breaking collection. The 73 contributors include veteran authors like Jessica Hagedorn, Lawson Fusao Inada, Trinh T. Minh-ha, Fred Wah, Kimiko Hahn, Arthur Sze, and John Yau, as well as such “premonitory” new poets as R. Zamora Linmark, Barry Masuda, Evelyn Lau, Amitava Kumar, and an emerging generation of Vietnamese and Korean American poets. Also featured are previously unpublished poems by the late Frances Chung, Roy Kiyooka, and Theresa Hak Kyung Cha.

 
praise

“Demonstrating the infinite range of possibilities overlooked by the too easily applied label of ‘multicultural’, this collection steeps the reader in alternative histories and approaches to language and tells stories seldom—if ever—heard. Recommended for most poetry collections.”
— Library Journal

“An exquisite artifact of activist experimentalism, theoretically smart and so beautiful it hurts, Premonitions promises to be a landmark in American letters for many years to come.”
— Maria Damon, University of Minnesota

“An impressive collection distinguished by its variety and sweep. By turns entertaining, exciting, troubling, it is always provocative. A major contribution.”
— David Palumbo-Liu, Stanford University

“Up to recently, Asian American literary anthologies have served to canonize authors, works, tastes, and ideas. Premonitions is different. From conception to layout, it explodes impulses to map centers and margins of Asian American poetry. Premonitions gives us a brilliant variety of poetry and poets who together show, we are all this and more.”
— Stephen Sumida, University of Washington

 
 
 

“The most consistent intelligent wide-ranging committed press I know – Kaya is an example of how to turn ‘small’ books into literary arrows that shoot straight and true into the heart of our culture and (of course) ourselves.”

— Junot Díaz