kaya publishes books of the asian pacific diaspora

 
 
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On Wednesday, October 15th at USC, Japanese authors and literature specialists came together to discuss the complexities of translation. The evening included two discussions. In “Baiting the Hook,” translators Michael Emmerich, Andrew Leong (translator of Lament in the Night), and Motoyuki Shibata discussed the tricky art of translating between Japanese and English. They explored the voices and identities of the translators and pondered the classification of certain works as “originals,” themselves being translations of reality and the imagination. “Baiting the Hook” was followed by a discussion between authors published by Monkey Business–Hideo Furukawa, Hiromi Ito, and Tomoka Shibasaki. Each performed a reading of their works and shared invaluable insight into their writing processes and personal perspectives. Given that each author traveled from Japan to participate in this discussion, it was truly a once-in-a-lifetime event!

We are so grateful to the USC Shinso Ito Center for Japanese Religions & Culture for working with us to organize this enlightening discussion. Enormous thanks to Kaya’s own Andrew Leong and all authors and translators affiliated with Monkey Business for a spectacular evening!

Left to right: Michael Emmerich, Andrew Leong, Roland Kelts, and Motoyuki Shibata

Left to right: Michael Emmerich, Andrew Leong, Roland Kelts, and Motoyuki Shibata

Roland and Motoyuki moderating the discussion

Roland and Motoyuki moderating the discussion

Michael and Andrew discuss the art of translation

Michael and Andrew discuss the art of translation

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What a crowd at USC!

What a crowd at USC!

Busily making sales!

Busily making sales!

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“The most consistent intelligent wide-ranging committed press I know – Kaya is an example of how to turn ‘small’ books into literary arrows that shoot straight and true into the heart of our culture and (of course) ourselves.”

— Junot Díaz